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Collection of FCFA research consortium and country summaries

FCFA research teams

Future Climate for Africa (FCFA) has produced a collection of  FCFA country and research consortium briefs. The country briefs provide a summary of FCFA’s in-country work and an overview of the approaches being implemented to promote the uptake and use…

FCFA Research Consortium Summary - UMFULA

Roy Bouwer (SouthSouthNorth); Declan Conway (London School of Economics); Luleka Dlamini (SouthSouthNorth); Estelle Rouhard (London School of Economics); Katharine Vincent (Kulima Integrated Development Solutions); And wider UMFULA team

This brief provides a summary of the UMFULA research consortium which carried out research on climate change in southern and eastern Africa as part of the FCFA programme. UMFULA aimed to improve climate information for medium-term (5-40 year) decision-making in…

How can we improve the use of information for a climate-resilient Malawi?

Dougill, A., Mkwambisi, D., Vincent, K., Archer, E., Bhave, A., Malinga, R.H., Mataya, D. C., Mittal, N. and Tembo-Nhlema, D.

This brief presents the main research findings from the Future Climate for Africa UMFULA project that are relevant for policy and practice on how to integrate climate information and increase resilience to climate change in Malawi. The research team is…

Deep Convection over Africa: annual cycle, ENSO, and trends in the hotspots

Neil Hart, Richard Washington, Ross Maidment

Africa is one of the three key regions of deep convection in the global tropics. There is a wealth of information on the intensity, variability and change of convection and associated rainfall in regions across the continent but almost all…

Key messages from the UMFULA project

UMFULA team

UMFULA has addressed questions of climate science, climate impacts and decision-making processes for adaptation, including: How does the climate of central and southern Africa work? And how well do climate models represent the key processes responsible for climate? How might the climate…

Creating useful and usable weather and climate information - insights from Participatory Scenario Planning in Malawi

Dorothy Tembo-Nhlema, Katharine Vincent and Rebecka Henriksson Malinga

For weather and climate information to be used at the grassroots level, it needs to be effectively interpreted and communicated so that it is both useful and usable. The gap between producers and users, however, has typically not been filled.…

Direct and indirect seasonal rainfall forecasts for East Africa using global dynamical models

Colman, A. W., Graham, R. J., & Davey, M. K.

Regional‐scale seasonal climate outlooks are typically produced using forecast information either local to the region or from another area with teleconnections to the region. Dynamical global long‐range forecast (LRF) systems can provide both types of information, and these two approaches…

Brief: Designing a process for assessing climate resilience in Tanzania’s Rufiji River basin

Declan Conway, Robel Geressu, Julien Harou, Japhet J. Kashaigili, Laetitia Pettinotti, and Christian Siderius

This brief introduces the concept of climate information and reasons for its use in major decisions about water, energy and agriculture, including new infrastructure investments. It outlines the innovative approach taken in the Rufiji River basin in Tanzania by the…

A Regional Project in Support of the SADC Cyber-Infrastructure Framework Implementation: Weather and Climate

Bopape, Mary-Jane M., Happy M. Sithole, Tshiamo Motshegwa, Edward Rakate, Francois Engelbrecht, Emma Archer, Anneline Morgan, Lwando Ndimeni, and Joel Botai.

Early warning systems in the areas of weather and climate for supporting decision making and strategic intervention in key sectors (e.g. water, health, energy, disaster risk management, and agriculture) rely on the use of earth observations and numerical models that…

Brief: Projecting future water availability in Lake Malawi and the Shire River basin

Ajay G. Bhave, Lauren Bulcock, Suraje Dessai, Declan Conway, Graham Jewitt, Andy J. Dougill, Seshagiri Rao Kolusu and David Mkwambisi

Malawi is highly dependent on water from Lake Malawi and the Shire River basin (Figure 1). Over 90% of Malawi’s electricity depends on outflows from the lake into the Shire River which feed three existing hydropower plants – Tedzani, Nkula…