Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content

PUBLICATIONS

FILTER YOUR SEARCH

RESOURCE TYPE

RESEARCH TEAMS​

THEME

Part of the co-production of climate information in AMMA-2050 included the development of an atlas containing information about projected future climate changes in West Africa, or climate metrics, that are relevant to supporting medium-term decision making. Such metrics included information on annual rainfall and the number of extreme precipitation days per year. In line with the capacity building aims of AMMA-2050, it was decided that the production of this atlas would be undertaken by African climate scientists who would be trained and supervised by UK-based climate scientists with more coding experience. The decision was made to combine production of the climate change atlases with a Python scientific language training course for African climate scientists involved in AMMA-2050.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
AMMA-2050 researchers have highlighted how engaging with the project has strengthened their ability to produce decision-relevant climate information not just in terms of technical capacities, but also in more effectively engaging with decision-makers to better appreciate their needs and develop more useful science. This engagement has also resulted in indirect benefits for some researchers, including career promotion.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
AMMA-2050 has developed methodologies for mapping inundation across Ouagadougou from intense storms, taking account of changes in land use and climate. Hydrological modelling allows exploration of how flows and inundated areas may change in the future at the city level in response to climate and land use change.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
There was limited understanding of climate change or impacts by FONERWA (Rwanda’s climate and environment fund), no direct considerations for climate variability or change in the application process and few project proposals were appropriately considering climate information. Recognising this, the FCFA work in Rwanda centred on developing the capacity of the FONERWA project appraisal team to perform a rudimentary screening on all project proposals. This would include a stronger review of applications for climate risks and provide FONERWA with information they can share with project developers so that climate information is better understood and incorporated into project design and implementation.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
The Climate Information for Resilient Tea Production (CI4Tea) project has developed a new methodology for producing site-specific climate change information. CI4Tea is co-producing climate information by iteratively engaging tea sector stakeholders in western Kenya to understand their climate information needs and incorporate their feedback for developing usable climate information.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Lake Victoria is one source of the Nile and it provides major fisheries (which are important both to local livelihoods and the national economies), is a key transport route between three major countries of the East African community and the Lake outflow provides a major hydropower source. The lake is unusual in that it is the largest tropical lake in the world and is largely fed by on-lake rain (not rivers) and largely emptied through evaporation (not rivers). The evaporation and lake-land circulations mean the lake triggers rain over the lake at night, making it a unique coupled hydrological-meteorological system.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
HyCRISTAL aims to integrate hydro-climate science into policy decisions for climate resilient infrastructure in East Africa. Within East Africa, HyCRISTAL is working in Uganda to develop use of climate information in water resources planning. Specifically, the British Geological Survey (BGS) is working in partnership with the Ugandan Ministry of Water and Environment (MWE) to improve the use of climate information in catchment management planning.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

HyCRISTAL’s rural work, is developing pathways for new climate research to support the resilience of rural communities vulnerable to climate change in two pilot locations, Mukono in Uganda and Homa Bay in Kenya, that capture two different Lake Victoria Basin national governance and policy regimes.

It is providing a rich suite of data and methodological training to understand current livelihood patterns and factors limiting peoples’ ability to adapt their sources of livelihood and policy implications through learning platforms and policy engagement in partnership with HyCRISTAL’s advocacy and academic partners in Uganda and Kenya. These tools are building an evidence-based pathway to rural adaptation at the county and national level. As HyCRISTAL’s climate modelling projections become available, they will intersect with the data on adaptations and the growing knowledge of decision-making processes.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Within the Urban Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector, there is recognition that climate change is important and will affect the delivery of water and sanitation services. Similarly technical and professional staff within city and utility departments, who are responsible for the design, construction and maintenance of the physical systems that support this service delivery, are also already beginning to include climate considerations into their work, albeit at quite a simplistic level. HyCRISTAL’s work in Kisumu and Kampala therefore initially focused on trying to engage key people in the city to explore the situation with the current and likely future WASH system(s), considering it to be embedded within other city systems such as solid waste, drainage and infrastructure.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Theatre forum, a participatory approach that supports public analysis and collective experimentation, was a powerful tool in the dialogue between scientists, people and policy makers as well as its ability to bring up cultural and socio-political issues which would otherwise stay on the sidelines. In an interdisciplinary and international project such as AMMA 2050, forum theatre proved to be a useful methodology to create common ground to communicate climate information in a meaningful way with a diverse range of actors, in a more equal setting.

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin