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New paper shows evidence of crop production losses in West Africa due to historical global warming

17 September 2019 // Agriculture, Climate science, Livelihoods

Achieving food security goals in West Africa will depend on the capacity of the agricultural sector to feed the rapidly growing population and to moderate the adverse impacts of climate change. A number of studies anticipate a reduction of the crop yield of the main staple food crops in the region by 2050 due to global warming.

“Training versus capacity building” Early Career Researcher, Diana Mataya, shares her learning and experiences as part of Future Climate for Africa’s Innovation Fund

09 September 2019 // Climate adaptation, Livelihoods

Diana Mataya, an Early Careers Researcher (ECR) with Future Climate for Africa (FCFA), shares her reflections on approaches to capacity building for climate change adaptation in Africa.

Impact Based Forecasting is set to save lives and livelihoods in East Africa

02 September 2019 // Climate information, Extreme weather, Livelihoods, Marine and Coastal

George Achia reports on an initiative to alert fisherfolk and other users of Lake Victoria to sudden severe weather – so that they can avoid harm to health and livelihood.

Funding boost links early-career wildlife expert to climate needs in Tanzania

24 July 2019 // Climate information, Livelihoods, Water

People living in the Kilombero Rivercatchment in east-central Tanzania make important water-use and farming decisions based on the seasonal forecasts they get from the country’s national meteorological service. This shows the importance of keeping regular, accurate forecast information flowing to communities on the ground, either through television and radio broadcasts or through the state’s agricultural extension services.

Ocean temperature increase along Senegalese coast could reduce sardine fisheries

17 July 2019 // Climate information, Climate science, Livelihoods, Marine and Coastal

The Canary upwelling ocean current is a conveyor belt-like flow of ocean water that sweeps along the northwest coast of Africa. Winds blowing from the continent and out to sea drive the surface waters away from the coast, allowing cold, nutrient-rich waters to rush up from the ocean floor. These nutrients produce blooms of algae, which feed the microscopic animals in the water, the zooplankton, which are an important link in the food chain, which produces the rich fisheries here in the North Atlantic.

Forest loss drives climate-linked flooding in Malawi

08 July 2019 // Agriculture, Extreme weather, Livelihoods, Water

The floods which hit Malawi’s southern Shire River Basin in 2015 were the worst on record, according to the country’s Department of Disaster Management, causing widespread damage to roads, buildings, and farmlands. If the government wants to contain the risk of future flooding like this, it needs to plan with more than just the likely changes in rainfall patterns in mind due to climate change. They must also factor in changes in vegetation cover as farmers increase their footprint in the area, and people fell trees for firewood.

'Hamster wheel' of short term planning hampers Malawi's climate response

18 April 2019 // Cities, Climate information, Extreme weather, Livelihoods, Marine and Coastal, Water

Beira: rebuild or relocate after mega-cyclone Idai?

01 April 2019 // Extreme weather, Livelihoods, Marine and Coastal, Water

Residents of the Mozambican city of Beira may not have had enough agency to respond adequately to storm warnings issued by the state meteorological services ahead of the arrival of Cyclone Idai this month, because they may not have had anything to compare a storm of this magnitude to.

‘Big data’ to help plan for climate shocks in East Africa

20 March 2019 // Agriculture, Livelihoods

Here’s the scenario: sweet potato farmers in the Mukono region of northern Uganda are expecting a reasonable harvest this spring. But the country’s meteorological service has issued a seasonal forecast that doesn’t bode well. They’re predicting heavier than normal rainfall in April, and the root vegetable doesn’t like to have feet wet.

How drought or flooding knock small businesses in African cities

15 March 2019 // Cities, Extreme weather, Livelihoods

How does a small business like a restaurant or panel beater in the Zambian capital, Lusaka, buffer itself against the impact of the kind of extreme drought that hit Southern Africa in the summer of 2014, owing to the arrival of the El Nino weather phenomenon? It buys a diesel generator as a back-up, in case of power outages resulting when lower dam levels in Lake Kariba contribute to the country’s power utility throttling back on its hydro-electricity production. To make this kind of business investment, though, might mean getting a loan to finance the cost of the generator.