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Theatre troupe helps gather climate knowledge in Senegal

20 September 2019 // Agriculture, Climate information, Knowledge creation and management

Fatick is in the heart of the peanut basin in Senegal, about 130km south-east of the capital, Dakar. The town perches on the edge of one of the many thin green tributaries that snake down from the desert and feed into the Saloum River which spills out into the Atlantic Ocean at a massive delta on the coast.

New paper shows evidence of crop production losses in West Africa due to historical global warming

17 September 2019 // Agriculture, Climate science, Livelihoods

Achieving food security goals in West Africa will depend on the capacity of the agricultural sector to feed the rapidly growing population and to moderate the adverse impacts of climate change. A number of studies anticipate a reduction of the crop yield of the main staple food crops in the region by 2050 due to global warming.

Coping with urban flooding in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

28 August 2019 // Cities, Water

Urban flooding is a major challenge in Ouagadougou. People may settle in flood-prone parts of the West African city, because they need to be close to the business centre and to job opportunities, or because they may have inherited land from their family. They often build informal homes in these places, in spite of the high risk of water-borne diseases like cholera or malaria during the rainy season, because of limited housing options in this ever more densely populated city where formal housing may be too expensive to buy or rent.

Ocean temperature increase along Senegalese coast could reduce sardine fisheries

17 July 2019 // Climate information, Climate science, Livelihoods, Marine and Coastal

The Canary upwelling ocean current is a conveyor belt-like flow of ocean water that sweeps along the northwest coast of Africa. Winds blowing from the continent and out to sea drive the surface waters away from the coast, allowing cold, nutrient-rich waters to rush up from the ocean floor. These nutrients produce blooms of algae, which feed the microscopic animals in the water, the zooplankton, which are an important link in the food chain, which produces the rich fisheries here in the North Atlantic.

Newsletter June 2019

28 June 2019 // Agriculture, Cities, Climate adaptation, Climate information, Climate science, Climate Services, Climate smart infrastructure, Extreme weather, Knowledge creation and management, Politics and Governance, Water

Welcome to the June 2019 edition of the Future Climate for Africa newsletter

AMMA-2050 presents their ground-breaking findings on climate change in West Africa to key stakeholders in Senegal at final annual meeting

27 June 2019 // Agriculture, Climate science, Extreme weather, Water

The AMMA-2050 (African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis-2050) research group met for their final annual meeting in Senegal from 10 – 14 June attended by researchers from West Africa, UK, and France. Chris Taylor (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK) the lead of AMMA-2050 opened the meeting by encouraging everyone present to take advantage of this final opportunity to discuss, share and think about the research from individual streams of their work and to solidify the key messages of AMMA-2050 as a whole.

Finding unlikely connections: when soil meets sky in atmospheric science

10 May 2019 // Climate information, Climate science, Extreme weather, Water

Dr Conni Klein was stuck. She was working with a team of scientists to build a computer model that will help them understand how years of clearing-felling tropical forest in the Ivory Coast, and replacing them largely with mono-crop cocoa plantations might change how clouds form here during the monsoon period, and what this could mean for rainfall.

Newsletter - March 2019

05 March 2019 // Cities, Climate information, Climate science, Extreme weather, Knowledge creation and management, Livelihoods

Welcome to the March 2019 edition of the Future Climate for Africa newsletter

Bull’s-eye set for West Africa’s ‘great green wall’ of trees

30 January 2019 // Agriculture, Climate information, Climate science, Extreme weather

The Sahara has slowly been edging its toe southwards for decades, as heavy grazing, farmers cutting trees for firewood, and drought are turning the edge of the semi-arid Sahel region of Africa into a desert. The ‘great green wall’ is an ambitious tree-planting programme that aims to rope in the cooperation of 20 different countries, from Senegal in the west, to Sudan and Eritrea in the east, to throw a wall of green in its path, and arrest the desert’s spread.

Newsletter - December 2018

14 January 2019 //

Welcome to the December 2018 edition of the Future Climate for Africa newsletter